English Games and Activites for ALT's

Our full list of games and activities for ALT's teaching ESL English in Japanese schools.

This game is all about using your poker face. And lying. And having fun of course. What do you have in your pencil case? Two pencils...

Wall to wall is an activity with the goal of helping your students speak up loud and clear if your English class is a little too quiet. Students try to speak to each other from two opposite sides of the classroom. It's not really a game - there are no points and no winners or losers, but it can increase confidence and help shy students.

Five of a kind is a game where students try to collect five (or any number really) of the same card. It's a flexible template that can be applied in many different ways.

A warm up that challenges students to think of questions, ask others and answer. Everyone has a chance to speak as each student must answer then ask the next student before they sit down.

Here are some free-to-download, pre-lined writing sheets with either one or two per A4 sheet.

Chanting is a simple drilling tool that adds cadence (usually by clapping) to repetition to liven it up. For any hip-hop fans - try taking it one step further and adding a beat to make it even more interesting.

This blackboard writing challenge works best in small to medium sized classes. Students are running around, writing letters on the blackboard, and competing against the other team(s) so there's a lot of movement and a lot of energy. Everyone loves this game!

Hand out card to everyone so they can either make name tags, business cards or name plates that fold into a triangular shape and sit on each student's desk.

Students make a fold out extend-a-picture that they can show off to their friends while using tall/short or long/short to describe their drawings. Once you show an example, your students will be eager to get artsy and create their own.

Students are challenged with guessing what their speaking partner likes and matching it with something they like too. This activity is for studying "I like ~."

Instead of just listening, students must run to get the numbers from you before returning to tell their groups. This adds physical action and speaking to the old classic English number lesson game.

Animal train is a very fun and noisy game for an elementary English lesson on animal names and onomatopoeic animal sounds.

This is an old party game, but it works well as a way to practice asking questions in the format "Am I ...?" for conversation classes as an easy to prepare for game or warm up.

Birthday groups gets students walking around and saying the month they were born in while listing to other's answers and deciding if a group should be made. Basically, it's practicing the months focusing on the student's own birthday.

In groups, students think up questions to ask the teacher. This is a great speaking activity to review recently studied grammar.