Lesson 3 I can swim.

Lesson 3: Summary of Goals

Vocabulary Sports, other actions you can do
Dialogue I can swim.
I can't swim.
Can you swim?
Yes, I can. / No, I can't.

4 class hours are recommended for Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 3 by MEXT - here's the official MEXT lesson plans pdf download.

Vocabulary includes the names of the sports (and other things you can do).

This lesson's grammar is "Can you swim?"

Lesson 3 Class 1

Vocabulary Sports, other actions you can do
Dialogue I can swim.
I can't swim.

Can you swim?
Yes, I can. / No, I can't.
Grey = future lessons, bold = current lesson, normal = previous lessons

Goals

  • Review Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 1
  • Say the sports and other actions.
  • Understand (listening to) people saying what they can and can't do.
  • Try saying what we can/can't do.

Activities

For reviewing Lesson 1:

For saying the sports/actions:

  • Pointing game (Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 3, page 10)
    Straight from the textbook, teacher says the action (eg. play baseball), students point and repeat.
    Level up by making it a group activity - in groups, students take turns as the teacher's role.
  • Ohajiki game (as seen in Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 4)
    Every student gets a number of (say, 5) place-markers (ohajiki). They place them on the pictures. The teacher says the action, students repeat and remove the ohajiki. When a student removes their last ohajiki, BINGO! - Give 'em a high five.

For listening to what others can/can't do:

  • Teachers talk
    Draw a big O (or YES or CAN) and X (or NO or CAN'T) on the blackboard. A teacher stands in the middle and says something they can or can't do. (eg. I can cook.) The students make a big O or X with their arms (or point left or right) then the teacher points or moves in front of the answer to confirm. ALT and HRT alternate.
    Optional - make students repeat.
    Level up: some advanced student will be able to say "I can/can't ~." Let those students take the place of the teacher.
    This activity is to let students practice hearing the difference between can and can't. It also reinforces can=positive and can't=negative. It is a good warm up to the Let's Listen (below) where students must listen without any gestures, lip reading or anything else to help them hear and understand.
  • Let's Listen (Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 3, page 11)
    Students listen to Ai and Hikaru saying what they can and can't do. Circle what they can do, draw a triangle around what they can't.
    (You can also do Taku, Sakura and Sayuri or wait till next class.)

For saying what we can/can't do:

  • Pair pointing game
    In pairs (or groups), textbook open to page 10, one student says something they can or can't do from that page. The other student(s) points to the appropriate image.
  • Activity 1 (Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 3, page 10)

    Students make pairs and using the textbook, consider whether their partner can or can't do each activity. Students fill in the 予想(よそう/yosou) space: O = can, Δ = can't. Next, they listen to their partner say what they actually can and/or can't do, this time filling in the 回答(かいとう/kaitou) space. Again, O = can, Δ = can't.
    Alternatively, this can be used with "Can you ~?" grammar, in which case I'd use it in a later class.

Lesson 3 Class 2

Vocabulary Sports, other actions you can do
Dialogue I can swim.
I can't swim.
Can you swim?
Yes, I can. / No, I can't.
Grey = future lessons, bold = current lesson, normal = previous lessons

Goals

Activities

To review Lesson 2:

  • Let's Chant (Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 2, page 8)
  • Birthday groups
  • Let's Listen (continued) (Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 3, page 11)
    If you didn't do the whole Let's Listen activity in class 1, finish it off here.
    I break it in half because it can take a long time, also because listening to Taku, Sakura, and Sayuri is a step up due to it being a conversation between two then three people and thus using "Can you ~?" rather than just "I can ~."

To review saying "I can/can't ~.":

  • Pair pointing game
    In pairs (or groups), textbook open to page 10, one student says something they can or can't do from that page. The other student(s) points to the appropriate image.
  • True or False (a.k.a. うそ(uso) game)
    In pairs, one student says "I can/can't ~.", the other students decides whether it's true or false. Points optional.

For answering "Can you ~.":

  • Let's Chant (Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 3, page 12)
  • Speedy answer relay
    Divide the class in half (or if you have a large class and have three teachers present, in thirds). Students line up facing teachers. Students come up to teachers, teachers ask "Can you ~?", students answer and go to the back of the line. Continue for a set time (say 1 minute). The team that answers the most questions is the winner. Ask losers if they want to challenge winning team again.

Lesson 3 Class 3

Vocabulary Sports, other actions you can do
Dialogue I can swim.
I can't swim.
Can you swim?
Yes, I can. / No, I can't.
Grey = future lessons, bold = current lesson, normal = previous lessons

Goals

  • Review saying "I can/can't ~."
  • Ask about what others can/can't do.

Activities

For reviewing "I can/can't ~."

  • Pair pointing game
  • True or False (a.k.a. うそ/uso game)

For asking "Can you ~?"

  • Activity 1 (Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 3, page 10)
    If you didn't use this in class one with students say "I can ~.", you can use it here.
    Students make pairs and using the textbook, consider whether their partner can or can't do each activity. Students fill in the 予想(よそう/yosou) circles: O = can, Δ = can't. Next, they ask each other. Again, O = can, Δ = can't.
  • Fishing for answers activity
    Set the students to walking around without the textbook, asking each other "Can you ~?" To make it interesting, set the goal of asking in hopes of hearing "Yes, I can." as the answer for the first half then "No, I can't." for the second half.
  • Talk to the teachers
    Let the students ask the teachers questions. One student says the question, everyone repeats and the teacher answers. Let students choose which teacher to ask.
  • Activity 2 (Hi, friends! 2 Lesson 3, page 12)
    Students walk around with their textbooks and ask others "Can you ~?" to collect signatures. There are a couple of ways to do this. Either they must get a "Yes, I can." response before they can get a signature, or they get the signature either way, and note with a O or X whether the answer was "Yes" or "No".

Lesson 3 Class 4

Vocabulary Sports, other actions you can do
Dialogue I can swim.
I can't swim.
Can you swim?
Yes, I can. / No, I can't.
Grey = future lessons, bold = current lesson, normal = previous lessons

Goals

  • Review all Lesson 3 content
  • Art project and presentation

Activities

Review activities

  • Pair pointing game
    To practice saying "I can/can't ~." See Class 1.
  • Speedy answer relay
    To practice answering "Can you ~?" questions. See Class 2.
  • Fishing for answers activity
    To practice asking others "Can you ~?" questions. See class 3.

Art project

In place of a normal class, let students have some time getting creative with color pencils, etc.

The "I can!" (and "I can't but I want to be able to do it") poster

Students are given an A4 piece of paper. Write "I can!" or something similar on the board, students can copy this to their poster then fill in the rest with drawings of things they can do. Show your example. At the end of the class, students present their posters to either the class or their lunch groups talking about what they can do using "I can ~." Encourage the teacher to post the posters somewhere in the class or around the school.

If you want the students also to talk about what they can't do, something like having half the page with a smiley face at the top for "can" and the other half with a sad face for "can't". Or, draw things you can do in color, things you can't in pencil only. Another idea is that the things they can't do are things they want to be able to do. You might have to discuss this concept with the HRT before the class so they can explain it in Japanese, after your English explanation, if you feel the students didn't quite understand.

I let students use a little Japanese so they can stray from what the textbook offers in terms of things they can do. eg. "I can なわとび."

Hi, friends! Plus Worksheet Download

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