Lesson 9 What would you like?

Lesson 9: Summary of Goals

Vocabulary Fruit
Restaurant food
International school lunch food
Dialogue What would you like?
I'd like pizza.

4 class hours are recommended for Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 9 by MEXT. Here's the official MEXT lesson plans pdf download.

Lesson 9 grammar is about ordering in a restaurant and instead of "What do you want?" from Lesson 6, students study the polite version - "What would you like?"

Vocabulary supports this by including common restaurant food. The lesson also includes an introduction to international school lunch menus.

A common area where students will get caught on is not being able to hear the "d" sound in "I'd like ~." and think this Lesson is talking about what food they like, even with the question being "What would you like?" See class 2 for a tip on how to ensure most students get it. (If you have any other ideas, please leave a comment below!

Lesson 9 Class 1

Vocabulary Fruit
Restaurant food
International school lunch food
Dialogue What would you like?
I'd like pizza.
Grey = future lessons, bold = current lesson, normal = previous lessons

Goals

  • Review Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 6
  • Listen and understand a list of things
  • Order a parfait (less polite grammar - "What do you want?")

Activities

To review Lesson 6:

The first part of lesson 9 uses grammar from Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 6 ("What do you want?") so reviewing this here makes starting Lesson 9 super smooth.

  • Let's Chant 2 (Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 6, p.25)
    "What do you want? The "C" card please.
  • Collecting Cards
    Students walk around with the ABC cards they cut out from the back of the book and ask each other "What do you want?".
    Options: Students carry all cards or just five; show cards or keep secret; play janken and only winner gets to ask or both ask; cards received count as point and count points at the end.
  • Give them what they want game
    Students find a talking partner, janken, loser asks "What do you want?" and draws whatever the winner requests.
    Alternatively, instead of students requesting anything (which is a lot of fun), you can also try limiting requests to letters.

To understand a list:

  • Let's Listen 1 (Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 9, p.36)
    Students listen to Sakura asking Taku what he wants in his parfait and decide which parfait matches the description.
    Option: Write Sakura and Taku on the blackboard and students copy the English when noting which parfait is whose.
  • Extending Let's Listen 1
    Students have listened to Sakura take Taku's order and vice versa - now let them take the HRT's order. (Give the HRT forewarning.) After that, they can break up into pairs and take each other's orders.
    Note that students still use "What do you want?" and not Lesson 9's "What would you like?"

To order a parfait (impolite):

The polite version comes in next class when students start using "What would you like?" This time, let students use what they already know - "What do you want?"

  • Let's Play (Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 9, p.36)
    The class takes the order ("What do you want?") of one student ("Pineapple, please."), with the teacher operating the computer to make the parfait.
    Option: Let the class rate the parfait from 1 to 10. Note it on the blackboard with the student's name. Compare to the next student's parfait.

Lesson 9 Class 2

Vocabulary Fruit
Restaurant food
International school lunch food
Dialogue What would you like?
I'd like pizza.
Grey = future lessons, bold = current lesson, normal = previous lessons

Goals

  • Review Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 7
  • Get used to hearing "I'd like ~."
  • Use "I'd like ~." to talk about what food we'd like to eat in the future.

Activities

To review Lesson 7:

  • Classroom "What's this?"
    Students walk around and find a partner. One student says come here and then pointing to something says "What's this?". If the other student cannot answer, they say "I don't know." If both students don't know, they call a teacher over and should be encouraged to again ask "What's this?"

To get used to "I'd like ~.":

  • Visual Explanation
    Usually elementary school English lessons are verbally focused but for this Lesson, I think students can particularly benefit from seeing the question and answer written out.
    The common issue with this lesson is students being unable to pick up on "I'd", thinking they should be saying "I like pizza." To show them it's not, write the question and answer on the board, like this:
    "What would you like?
    "I would like pizza.
    Read it together, pointing to each word as you say it. Then, explain that I would is long and normally we say the short version: "I'd". Erase the "woul" of would, show that the "I" moves over and insert an apostrophe. Say "I'd" a few times together till they get it.
  • Let's Chant (Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 9, p. 37)
    Listen once but before listening, ask students if they can hear the "d" in "I'd". Then chant.
    The second time, ask students for gestures for milk, pizza, cake and pudding. "What's your milk gesture?" or "Show me a milk gesture." Chant with the best gestures.
  • Let's Listen 2 (Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 9, p.37)
    Students listen and draw lines from each person to what they order.
    Tip: Ask students who each person sitting at the table is, starting with Sakura. (Father, Grandmother, Grandfather, Mother).
    Tip: Check answers by pretending the class is Sakura, etc. Teacher asks "What would you like?" Students answer "I'd like ..."

Use "I'd like ~.":

  • Happy Birthday Dinner
    This is an imagination game. In groups, students imagine it's their birthday and say what they'd like for dinner. Encourage reactions from those listening such as Wow, Yummy, Nice.
    Each confession could be prompted by the listeners with "Happy Birthday" or/as well as "What would you like?" (However, the main point is to use "I'd like ~.")
    Note: This is a short activity but is fun because of how different each person's birthday dinner wish is.

Lesson 9 Class 3

Vocabulary Fruit
Restaurant food
International school lunch food
Dialogue What would you like?
I'd like pizza.
Grey = future lessons, bold = current lesson, normal = previous lessons

Goals

Activities

To review Lesson 8:

  • Let's Chant (Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 8, p.34)
    "What do you study on Monday?
    "I study Japanese and science.
  • Explaining a Day's Schedule
    Ask the students "What do you study on Friday?"
    Students list subjects either in the same form as the chant or;
    If you demonstrate with the HRT first, in the form "First, Japanese, second, math..."
  • "What subject do you like?" Walk & Talk
    Students walk around asking a few others what subject they like. Encourage responses like cool, me too, etc.

 To ask and answer "What would you like?:

  • Make a Match
    Students choose one large item (p.38) and one small item (p.39) as their order (ignore the row of food along the bottom of page). They walk around and, using "What would you like?", "I'd like ~.", try to find someone with the same order. If students make a match, come to teacher - teacher asks pair "What would you like?"
    Note: If class is small, only one large item is enough.
    Tip: If you don't have stickers to give as prize for success, high fives work.

To make a healthy meal set:

  • Our Menu Set
    1. Groups (4-6 students) start with a blank A3 piece of paper. With consideration to nutrition, taste, and volume, they agree on a set meal (using food items from p.38 - 39). They name the set.
    2. Each group introduces their set. (Put each sheet of paper up on the blackboard.)
    3. Each student orders a set - "I'd like the ~ set."
      To do this I had rows stand one at a time, the rest of the class act as shopkeepers asking "What would you like?" once and the standing students quickly "order" then sit.
      After each order, I put a mark under the set they ordered.
      Once every student has ordered, the most popular set is the winner, applause for that group.
    Note: This takes a long time. Hurry students at every stage. Demonstrate menu discussion and very simple drawing and naming with the teacher. I don't explain that voting will happen - students seem excited when they figure out that's what's happening.

Lesson 9 Class 4

Vocabulary Fruit
Restaurant food
International school lunch food
Dialogue What would you like?
I'd like pizza.
Grey = future lessons, bold = current lesson, normal = previous lessons

Goals

  • Review Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 5
  • Review asking and answering "What would you like?"
  • Look at school lunches around the world

Activities

To review Lesson 5:

  • Walk and Talk - "What ___ do you like?"
    Start by asking the HRT "What ramen do you like?" Ask students for more ideas we can ask about, instead of ramen. Common ideas - color, sport, etc. Students then walk around and ask 4 different questions to 4 different people (2 boys, 2 girls).

To review "What would you like?":

  • Let's Chant (Hi, friends! 1 Lesson 9, p.37)
    Chant with gestures that students suggest. (See Class 2)
    Make an original chant by substituting food using student suggestions. "I'd like milk and pizza." might become "I'd like sushi and ice cream."
  • Happy Birthday Dinner (See Class 2)
    Students make groups and describe what they'd like for their birthday dinner.

To look at school lunch around the world:

  • Activity 2 (Hi, friends 1 Lesson 9, p.40)
    1. Introduce countries.
    2. Listen to each country's child (students write answers in books).
    3. Get answers from students. Point to a meal and ask "What country?" then "What number?" Maybe write answer below box with writing tool.
    4. Click Answers to see the answers then cheer and clap at students' success.
    5. Talk about lunches. Point and ask "What's this?", "Do you like fish?" "What (school lunch) would you like?" and get answers from everyone for last question.
    6. Watch video.

Hi, friends! Plus Worksheet Download

Add comment


Security code
Refresh